Advocate

Become an Advocate Against Hunger

Contact your U.S. representatives and senators, ask them to expand feeding and nutrition programs and urge them to provide the resources needed to end hunger in North Texas. Start by researching federal feeding program below, then visit senate.gov or house.gov to find your local representatives. 

There’s never a good time to be hungry. And in a troubled economy, food insecurity is an urgent problem.

Learn about Federal Programs

Research and support federal programs that are most crucial to helping hungry people in our community. Below are some of the federal programs that benefit NTFB clients:

Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
CACFP provides food assistance through child and adult care institutions. NTFB serves as a sponsor of the CACFP, which is a reimbursement program, operated via the Texas Department of Agriculture. The after-school, at-risk supper program serves a mix of hot and cold unitized meals to children between the ages of 5 and 17.  During the school year, NTFB distributes (on average) 1,400 meals at 21 sites every weekday through CACFP.

Commodities Supplemental Food Program (CSFP)
CSFP is a federally funded program that works to supplement the diets of qualifying low-income individuals with USDA foods.  In 2000, NTFB became the first Commodities Supplemental Food Program (known locally as People and Nutrition, or PAN) distributor in Texas. Each month, 8,500 participants receive an estimated 30 pounds of USDA commodities at over 100 PAN distribution sites in Dallas, Collin, Denton and Ellis counties.

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
SNAP is the federal nutrition program formerly known as "food stamps". Because SNAP is a federal entitlement program, eligibility is based on household size and income. SNAP benefits are provided on an EBT (electronic benefits transfer) card that works much like a debit card. The average SNAP benefit per households within NTFB's service area is $247/month. Nationally, only 72 percent of those eligible for this program benefit from it. In Texas, only 62 percent of those eligible receive assistance.  In 2012, NTFB provided access to 16.5 million meals through SNAP. 

Summer Food Service Program (SFSP)
SFSP was established by the USDA to ensure that low-income children continue to receive nutritious meals when school is not in session.  During the summer, NTFB serves as a SFSP sponsor to distribute (on average) 2,600 meals and snacks daily. All meals follow USDA requirements and actually exceed the minimum amount of fruits/vegetables required for a complete meal by ¼  cup.

Supplemental Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC)
WIC allows pregnant women and mothers with very young children to “buy” nutritious food such as milk, eggs, bread and other staples. The program is discretionary, so funding changes from year to year and isn’t required to keep pace with increasing needs. 

For more information about hunger, nutrition, and food assistance policy, please visit these links:

Hunger Action Center

Square Meals

Food Research and Action Center

NTFB Hunger Center

Texas Food Bank Network

 

Questions? Please contact:
Anna Kurian

Contact your congressperson:

senate.gov
house.gov

 

North Texas Food Bank 4500 S. Cockrell Hill Road Dallas, TX 75236-2028 214.330.1396 (MAP IT)

The development of this website was generously underwritten by The Hoblitzelle Foundation.

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